New Age Amazon

a girl who does stuff

  • 17th April
    2013
  • 17
  • 17th April
    2013
  • 17
gailsimone:

maxisonthemoon:

gailsimone:

birdie-told-me:

If only we knew, Diana.

I still get this all the time.
If the focus is off of dudes for even a moment, it’s because I hate men.
Which I don’t, I think guys are swell.
It’s weird.

If you’ve ever seen a protest of a Warren Farrell talk or any MRM group you will see that feminists hate it when the focus is on men for a second. Of course feminism isn’t the same as gender equality, but I guess many people think it is. I’ve heard, at these protests, feminists say “why do men need a ‘mens space’?” In the context that men should go to feminist spaces instead of MRM spaces. So it’s not that gender equality=misandry, it’s that the way feminism goes about gender equality is usually at the expense of men.

Hahaha, good one! Oh, wait. You’re serious with this?

gailsimone:

maxisonthemoon:

gailsimone:

birdie-told-me:

If only we knew, Diana.

I still get this all the time.


If the focus is off of dudes for even a moment, it’s because I hate men.

Which I don’t, I think guys are swell.

It’s weird.

If you’ve ever seen a protest of a Warren Farrell talk or any MRM group you will see that feminists hate it when the focus is on men for a second. Of course feminism isn’t the same as gender equality, but I guess many people think it is. I’ve heard, at these protests, feminists say “why do men need a ‘mens space’?” In the context that men should go to feminist spaces instead of MRM spaces. So it’s not that gender equality=misandry, it’s that the way feminism goes about gender equality is usually at the expense of men.

Hahaha, good one! Oh, wait. You’re serious with this?

Steph Brown: Misandrist

  • 15th April
    2013
  • 15
  • 9th April
    2013
  • 09

Talking with the Director of Wonder Women! The Untold Story of America’s Superheroines

dcwomenkickingass:

Next week PBS will air Wonder Women! The Untold Story of America’s Superheroines that looks at the history, and more importantly, the legacy of Wonder Woman.

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I viewed the documentary a few weeks ago and it is a powerful piece that shows why heroic characters like Wonder Woman are so important to society and to young girls and women. It includes interviews with Gloria Steinem, Lynda Carter, Gail Simone and Trina Robbins among others as well as everyday women who have been inspired by the character.

The project has been a labor of love over many years for the film’s director Kristy Guevara-Flanagan. I’ve touched base with her over the years as she’s been funding, creating and showing the film around the country. With the film about to debut to a television audience, she took a few minutes out of her busy schedule to talk about the project.

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Read More

This documentary is AMAZING.  I wrote about it back here, but I’d just like to re-iterate: I cried.  This is powerful stuff and from the origins of Wonder Woman to the “will you choose to be strong” speech from the series finale of Buffy, it shows the history, the impact and the importance of superheroines.

So, all of you: read this interview, watch this documentary and keep kicking ass.

  • 1st April
    2013
  • 01
  • 7th March
    2013
  • 07

So, tonight I got a chance to attend a screening of the documentary WONDER WOMEN: The Untold History of American Superheroines.  As the name suggests, it starts off as an examination of the character of Wonder Woman, but then traces how her influence led to characters like Sarah Connor and Buffy Summers, what she means to feminist icons like Gloria Steinem and Kathleen Hanna and the importance of visible superheroines in the media.

I absolutely loved it, which shouldn’t come as a shock.  But I’ve gotta confess something: while I watched most of the movie with a huge smile on my face.  However, there were a few parts.  Well.

I maybe teared up a bit.

The movie showed a clip of Buffy’s speech from “Chosen” about giving all of the potentials her power.  I got teary.

In an interview, Jane Espenson mentioned that she still gets people who approach her at cons and tell her the only reason they made it through high school was because Buffy did (BTW: this is true for me, as well).

And.  Okay, Gail Simone talking about her take on Wonder Woman and her approach to writing the character…yeah.  That part made me tear up.

Look, maybe it was just because I had a long day at work.  But I think more likely it’s because that is how important superheroines have been to me in my life and how much of a symbol of hope they are for me. 

I know a lot of people shut down or roll their eyes when I go on and on about women’s portrayal and visibility in comics.  Because to them, the question is why should it matter if there are representations of strong, complicated female characters in comics?  But a lot of that comes from fanboys who don’t have to actually actively look to find strong, relate-able role models in media.  Media produced for you isn’t considered a “genre,” it’s just considered the status quo.  People don’t feel they have to make a special effort to portray characters you’ll identify with.

Think about that: it’s not considered NATURAL to create media that will appeal to women.  It’s something that has to be studied and coded and treated like rocket science.  We live in a world where it is considered an amazing thing when a male creator can create a strong female character…we live in a world where a male creator is more likely to find success in doing so because women make up such a small percentage of media creators (I believe the documentary tonight mentioned that women are responsible for creating 3% of the world’s media.  THREE PERCENT).  And that’s not even touching intersectionality, because let’s face it, most of the notable heroines are white, able-bodied, straight cis women (yes, I’m sure you can name exceptions to that rule, but one or two characters does NOT equal “fair representation.”  No matter how awesome Oracle, Storm and Kate Kane are.).

Look, just watch the documentary if you get a chance. Find information on a screening or when it is going to air in your area.  And try to understand that Wonder Woman isn’t just a token female character.  What she is to people like me, what she stands for, is an incredibly powerful thing.

  • 22nd February
    2013
  • 22
  • 13th February
    2013
  • 13

dcwomenkickingass:

Wonder Women! Documentary to Air on PBS

The documentary Wonder Women! which looks at “the untold story of American Superheroines is finally coming to TV. The film, which has been playing a events around the country for the past year, will be shown beginning April 15. You can see a bit at the trailer above. This film was a labor of love for creator Kristy Guevara-Flanagan and many of you help fund it through Kickstarter. PBS recently aired a segment on Wonder Woman  in their Pioneers of Television series. 

AND!  If you are in Pittsburgh, the Toonseum will be doing a screening in March!

  • 12th December
    2012
  • 12
gailsimone:

You know who easily and completely understands Wonder Woman?
These two right here.
You know who finds her ‘difficult’ to understand?
Everyone in Hollywood, apparently.

But ZOMG, how can she be “strong” and “a woman” at the same time?  Oh, you mean like a BITCH, right?  So, she’s a bitch who shuns anything feminine? 
Wait, no?  But.  That doesn’t make sense!  Oh, wait, so she’s strong but she’s secretly lovelorn because the guy she’s after is married and she privately cries over this?
STILL no?
Well, we’re running out of stereotypes here, so that’s it.  No Wonder Woman movie or TV show for you.  Next time, make sure your leading female isn’t so “well-rounded,” dammit!

gailsimone:

You know who easily and completely understands Wonder Woman?

These two right here.

You know who finds her ‘difficult’ to understand?

Everyone in Hollywood, apparently.

But ZOMG, how can she be “strong” and “a woman” at the same time?  Oh, you mean like a BITCH, right?  So, she’s a bitch who shuns anything feminine? 

Wait, no?  But.  That doesn’t make sense!  Oh, wait, so she’s strong but she’s secretly lovelorn because the guy she’s after is married and she privately cries over this?

STILL no?

Well, we’re running out of stereotypes here, so that’s it.  No Wonder Woman movie or TV show for you.  Next time, make sure your leading female isn’t so “well-rounded,” dammit!

  • 1st January
    2012
  • 01